The Ultimate Guide to Idaho’s Wine Country

Idaho is a state with a rich history of winemaking, dating back to the early 19th century. Today, Idaho is home to over 100 wineries, producing a wide variety of wines from Cabernet Sauvignon to Merlot. Idaho’s wine country is located in the southern part of the state, in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The climate in this region is ideal for growing grapes, with warm days and cool nights. Idaho’s wine country is also home to some of the most stunning scenery in the United States, with rolling hills, snow-capped mountains, and crystal-clear lakes.

History of Idaho Wine

The first grapes were planted in Idaho in the early 19th century by French fur trappers. However, it wasn’t until the late 19th century that commercial winemaking began in the state. In 1883, the first commercial winery in Idaho was established by George Husmann in Boise. Husmann was a German immigrant who had learned the art of winemaking in his native country. He planted a variety of grapes on his estate, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Riesling. Husmann’s wines were well-received, and he soon became one of the most successful winemakers in the state.

In the early 20th century, Idaho’s wine industry suffered a setback due to Prohibition. However, after Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the industry began to slowly recover. In the 1970s, a new generation of winemakers began to emerge in Idaho, and the state’s wine industry began to grow rapidly. Today, Idaho is home to over 100 wineries, and the state’s wines are consistently praised by critics.

Climate and Soil

Idaho’s wine country is located in the southern part of the state, in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. The climate in this region is ideal for growing grapes, with warm days and cool nights. The average temperature in the summer is around 75 degrees Fahrenheit, and the average temperature in the winter is around 30 degrees Fahrenheit. The region also receives an average of 20 inches of rain per year.

The soil in Idaho’s wine country is a mix of volcanic ash and loam. This soil is well-drained and provides the perfect environment for growing grapes. The combination of the climate and the soil in Idaho’s wine country produces wines that are rich and complex.

Grape Varieties

Idaho’s winemakers grow a variety of grapes, including Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay, and Riesling. Cabernet Sauvignon is the most popular grape variety in Idaho, and it is used to produce some of the state’s best wines. Merlot is another popular grape variety, and it is used to produce smooth, fruity wines. Chardonnay is a white grape variety that is used to produce crisp, refreshing wines. Riesling is another white grape variety that is used to produce sweet, aromatic wines.

Wineries in Idaho

Idaho is home to over 100 wineries, and the state’s wineries are located in a variety of different regions. Some of the most popular wine regions in Idaho include the Snake River Valley, the Lewis-Clark Valley, and the Coeur d’Alene Valley. Each region has its own unique climate and soil conditions, which produce wines with different characteristics.

Some of the most popular wineries in Idaho include Ste. Chapelle Winery, Sawtooth Winery, and Cinder Winery. Ste. Chapelle Winery is located in the Snake River Valley, and it is one of the oldest wineries in the state. Sawtooth Winery is located in the Sawtooth Valley, and it is known for its award-winning Pinot Noir wines. Cinder Winery is located in the Coeur d’Alene Valley, and it is known for its unique blend of red and white wines.

Touring Idaho’s Wine Country

Idaho’s wine country is a beautiful and scenic place to visit. There are a number of different ways to tour the region, including by car, by bike, and by foot. If you’re planning to visit Idaho’s wine country, here are a few tips:

  • Plan your trip in advance. There are a number of different wineries in Idaho, so it’s important to plan your trip in

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